The Fall of Gondolin

The Fall of Gondolin

Book - 2018
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"In the Tale of The Fall of Gondolin are two of the greatest powers in the world. There is Morgoth of the uttermost evil, unseen in this story but ruling over a vast military power from his fortress of Angband. Deeply opposed to Morgoth is Ulmo, second in might only to Manwë, chief of the Valar: he is called the Lord of Waters, of all seas, lakes, and rivers under the sky. But he works in secret in Middle-earth to support the Noldor, the kindred of the Elves among whom were numbered Húrin and Túrin Turambar. Central to this enmity of the gods is the city of Gondolin, beautiful but undiscoverable. It was built and peopled by Noldorin Elves who, when they dwelt in Valinor, the land of the gods, rebelled against their rule and fled to Middle-earth. Turgon King of Gondolin is hated and feared above all his enemies by Morgoth, who seeks in vain to discover the marvellously hidden city, while the gods in Valinor in heated debate largely refuse to intervene in support of Ulmo's desires and designs. Into this world comes Tuor, cousin of Túrin, the instrument of Ulmo's designs. Guided unseen by him Tuor sets out from the land of his birth on the fearful journey to Gondolin, and in one of the most arresting moments in the history of Middle-earth the sea-god himself appears to him, rising out of the ocean in the midst of a storm. In Gondolin he becomes great; he is wedded to Idril, Turgon's daughter, and their son is Eärendel, whose birth and profound importance in days to come is foreseen by Ulmo. At last comes the terrible ending. Morgoth learns through an act of supreme treachery all that he needs to mount a devastating attack on the city, with Balrogs and dragons and numberless Orcs. After a minutely observed account of the fall of Gondolin, the tale ends with the escape of Túrin and Idril, with the child Eärendel, looking back from a cleft in the mountains as they flee southward, at the blazing wreckage of their city. They were journeying into a new story, the Tale of Eärendel, which Tolkien never wrote, but which is sketched out in this book from other sources. Following his presentation of Beren and Lúthien Christopher Tolkien has used the same 'history in sequence' mode in the writing of this edition of The Fall of Gondolin. In the words of J.R.R. Tolkien, it was 'the first real story of this imaginary world' and, together with Beren and Lúthien and The Children of Húrin, he regarded it as one of the three 'Great Tales' of the Elder Days." - Amazon.com
Publisher: Boston :, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt,, [2018]
Edition: First U.S. edition.
ISBN: 9781328613042
1328613046
Branch Call Number: FIC TOLK
Characteristics: 302 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 22 cm

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schmegu_at_hcplc
Jan 08, 2019

Copied from "People of Middle Earth": Honestly, I learned so much about writing and understanding the world around me by reading these books from Tolkien. Getting this break down of how the world of Middle Earth ran made things so interesting. As I started to get more and more into history, so much of his world building, and the wars going on between Sauron and the free people of Middle Earth, or the wars between the Elves and Morgoth, or (I could continue) were such clear parallels to what was happening in Tolkien's world.... and they are still such clear parallels to what is happening in today's world. We always talk about how Dystopian novels are a way of warning us about the path we're following, and how our future might turn out, but we forget that a lot of Fantasy novels are also reflections of people today, and how we need to get our acts together.

s
schmegu_at_hcplc
Jan 08, 2019

Copied from "People of Middle Earth": Honestly, I learned so much about writing and understanding the world around me by reading these books from Tolkien. Getting this break down of how the world of Middle Earth ran made things so interesting. As I started to get more and more into history, so much of his world building, and the wars going on between Sauron and the free people of Middle Earth, or the wars between the Elves and Morgoth, or (I could continue) were such clear parallels to what was happening in Tolkien's world.... and they are still such clear parallels to what is happening in today's world. We always talk about how Dystopian novels are a way of warning us about the path we're following, and how our future might turn out, but we forget that a lot of Fantasy novels are also reflections of people today, and how we need to get our acts together.

v
vanravenstein
Oct 30, 2018

I liked the overall story and structure of "Beren and Luthien" better. This book seemed to tell the same story over and over again, without any change in form (prose). I found myself skipping over many pages. I think you'd have to be an extreme fan of Tolkien to really treasure this book (I'm talking Stephen Colbert-level). The illustrations are good.

j
JonMoss
Oct 05, 2018

Tolkien Society of Kansas City will finish reading this book in October and discuss it on October 26th (location TBD)

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