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This reminded me of an Onion headline "President orders Brando to gain 250 pounds: Star's raw sexuality too dangerous at present weight, Ike says." This 1962 production of "Mutiny on the Bounty" is best remembered for Brando's notorious behavior on set, which damaged his reputation for years and it wouldn't be until the double comeback of "The Godfather" and "Last Tango in Paris" in the 70s that he'd be taken seriously again. Sure, he was the most influential American actor of the 20th century, but you do have to wonder how great was he when he so often clashed with directors and his co-stars in what is an intensely collaborative art (film). Anyway, this film is long, boring, and bloated (The other reviewer's 5-star rating is just wrong.), despite its desire to be epic, which means it includes a prelude, intermission, and entr'acte. I recently saw an actual epic, "Lawrence of Arabia," so this suffers in comparison. Shot in 70mm, it would probably look great on the big screen and the island settings are lovely. Based on the same novel as the earlier version, starring Clark Cable as Christian and Charles Laughton as Bligh, this "Mutiny" has a less heroic, more ambiguous Christian, but a reliably sadistic Bligh (played by Trevor Howard). It is interesting to contrast the very different acting styles of Howard and Brando, who just seems detached from the whole production and in a world of his own, which includes odd accents and the occasional funny hat (Hey, Johnny Depp's career started here!). The other major actor is Richard Harris, who is forgettable. Brando fell in love and married his Tahitian co-star. He also clashed with the first director, Carol Reed, who was fired from the production, and was apparently constantly trying to re-write the script, which had numerous screenwriters attached to it. So, I guess you have to see it because it's where Brando started to lose his way, but it's a tedious, self-important movie.

lukasevansherman's rating:
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